#KELTChat: Your big questions in ELT (Sunday 14th December, 8pm)

This #KELTchat 1 hour chat is a chance for you to bring your classroom wonderings into a public forum where we can discuss them. The topic was inspired by the #KELTChat live session that we will be running on the previous day at the English Expo in Seoul (Room B, 3:15pm), during which we will be discussing Scott Thornbury’s Big Questions in ELT. Here is a video introduction from Scott Thornbury himself. The session and the chat are not linked, however, so there is no need to have attended the session to participate.

The chat will be on December 14th, 2014 at 8pm, Korea time.
All are welcome and here is a link for times around the world. 

For this chat, we are asking participants to create one question to share with others in the chat, and to post that question when you join the chat, something like this:

If you’re in need of inspiration, you can read Scott Thornbury’s big questions by clicking the “look inside” option on this page.

We hope to see you during the chat.

#KELTchat Slowburn: Reflecting on the Teacher Behind the Practice

This #KELTchat Slowburn™ is roughly based around Tom Farrell’s workshop on November 30th in Seoul. Of course, attending the talk is not a pre-requisite for participating in the chat, which is aimed at being an exploration.

The chat will be on December 2nd, 2014 from 10 am to 10 pm, Korea time.
All are welcome and here is a link for times around the world. 

Here are some questions to consider and maybe to guide the chat:

  • Farrell says, “Good teaching requires more than application of methods; it requires self-knowledge.” What does self-knowledge mean to you in this case?
  • How can we go about acquiring this knowledge?
  • How can knowing about ourselves impact our teaching?
  • How can we discover our tacit beliefs about teaching and learning?
  • Have you ever discovered your hidden beliefs? How did it happen? What did it mean for your teaching and development?
  • What does it really mean to know yourself as a teacher?
  • Where do your teaching beliefs and philosophy come from?
  • Your own related questions.

Some sentence stems (“narrative frames”) that might help us explore our thoughts on teaching are:

  1. To me, the word teacher means…
  2. I became a teacher because…
  3. I believe teaching is a calling because…
  4. When I first started to teach I…
  5. The place I teach now is…
  6. My students are…
  7. I enjoy going into school each morning because…
  8. I find teaching exciting and challenging because…
  9. I do not thinking teaching is a job because…
  10. I think teaching is a profession because…
  11. The best aspect of my life as a teacher is…
  12. The worst aspect of my life as a teacher is..
  13. What I really enjoy doing in my classroom is…
  14. My students believe in….
    (These frames are all directly from the workshop.)

Which of them was easier for you to answer? Hardest? What made you think? What connections can you draw? What does this tell you about your beliefs about teaching?

We are looking forward to seeing you in the chat and as always please feel free to pop in and out as time permits

 

“Who I am is how I teach.” 

#KELTChat “Medium Burn” – Technology that we actually use! (Tuesday 18th November, 12pm-6pm)

Hello everyone.

With a squeal of tires and a puff of oil smoke, #keltchat skids back on to the information superhighway with a (new nomclemature alert!) Medium Burn™. This will be very similar to our usual Tuesday Slowburn™ chats, but half the length. As usual it takes place on Twitter, but this time from 12-6 pm only. Here is a link on the timings for those not in Korea, as the times listed are Korea standard time.

The topic for this chat is an old chestnut, but one worth roasting again at this cold time of year. We’ve discussed technology before, but this time we are focusing on stuff that we are already using in or out of our classrooms. It might be worth defining technology here fairly openly as anything that requires electricity to run. Things we’d like to know when you join the chat are:

  • What technology do you currently use in the course of your teaching?
  • Why did you choose to use it?
  • What kind of benefits does it bring?
  • Do you ever have any problems with it?
  • What advice would you give to a teacher who is thinking about using it?
  • Have your students given you any feedback about it?
  • Are there any reasons why a teacher wouldn’t want to use it?

We hope that you can join us for some or all of the chat. If you’d like to participate but you’re not sure how, there are a number of guides linked at the top of the page, or feel free to leave a message on the Facebook group. We hope to see you on Tuesday.

#KELTChat on Linguistic Landscapes (Sunday November 2nd)

The next #KELTchat will be at 8 pm on Sunday November 2nd and the topic will be Linguistic Landscapes. More specifically, we will be talking about about Linguistic Landscapes and their implications and uses for English teaching. People from all around are welcome to participate and all are welcome. For this chat we are honoured to have Michael Chesnut and Sungwoo Kim as guest moderators.

chesnut linguistic landscapes

Photos by @MichaelChesnut2

What do we mean when we say, “Linguistic Landscapes?” Scott Thornbury, mentioner of #KELTchat, offers a nice introduction in this post. The post cites an ELT Journal article from Peter Sayer on Using the Linguistic Landscape as a Pedagogical Resource. And here is an article called “The Language Lessons Around Us: Undergraduate English Pedagogy and Linguistics Landscape Research” that is focused on research and experiences at a Korean university.

A central question for the chat will be:
How can various linguistic landscapes be used in language teaching? 

and some additional questions might include:

  • How can we get started using Linguistic Landscapes in (and out of) class?
  • What challenges might you expect using Linguistic Landscapes with students?
  • What ideas do you have for using Linguistic Landscapes with students?
  • How can we use the English in Korea’s multilingual Linguistic Landscape to help our students develop their language skills?
  • How can we use technology like Google Street View to explore Linguistic Landscapes beyond Korea?

Of course, other questions and points will emerge in the flow of the conversation. We are looking forward to chatting with you!

Candid Lesson Planning: A Very Special #KELTchat Slowburn. Tuesday 2014.10.14, 10am – 10pm Seoul time.

How do you really plan lessons? This question and others will be discussed in the next #KELTchat Twitter chat on Tuesday 2014.10.14, from 10 am to 10 pm Seoul time.

This is a special Slowburn because the final hour will find us LIVE on ELT Live in a Google Hangout hosted by Jeff Lebow of WorldBridges.

Candid lesson plan CHALLENGE!
For this chat we have a (totally optional) challenge to get you started whenever you arrive from 10 am to 10 pm.
If you can, share a picture of a real lesson plan, or of your real planning process. We want to peek inside your notebook/computer/brain!
Why is this how you plan? How often do you do it? How long do you spend?
Why is planning this way useful for you?

In addition to the challenge, please feel free to add your own questions and issues with planning and prep.

Some other questions to consider might be:

  • Are there any limitations about your planning you’ve been thinking about?
  • Is there anything you’re thinking about trying out regarding planning?
  • How is you planning similar and different than when you first starting teaching?
  • Who sees your plans?
  • What is an essential aspect of your plans or something you need to do?
  • What is your favourite part of lesson prep? Least favourite?
  • How/when/why do you throw away your plans during teaching?
  • Do you keep plans? Do you come back to them later? Why?
  • What sites, ideas and resources are helpful for you as related to lesson prep?
  • Have you heard any good quotes that can be related to lesson prep?
  • What aspects of preparing for classes take the longest for you? Do you have strategies for streamlining the preparation process?

#KELTchat Slowburn – Getting the most out of conferences (Tuesday, September 23rd 10 am-10 pm)

Photo by Rodd Lucier used under Creative Commons license https://www.flickr.com/photos/thecleversheep/3165592302/

Photo by Rodd Lucier used under Creative Commons license https://www.flickr.com/photos/thecleversheep/3165592302/

Hello again. #KELTChat’s fall/autumn activities continue with a return to our Slowburn™ chats. The topic is “Getting the most out of conferences,” and the chat will take place via the medium of Twitter on the 23rd September 2014 between the hours of 10 am and 10 pm, Seoul time.

The Slowburn chat is intended to be a more relaxed and less involved alternative to our intensive one hour chats. Spacing it out over twelve hours means that you have time to dip in and out as you wish, and topics have time to rise, fall, be resurrected and fully explored over the course of the day. We hope that this will better suit people with busy weekday schedules.

With at least two large East Asian conferences upcoming (the KOTESOL and JALT international conferences) we thought it would be a good time to look at how we can best use these opportunities to learn and connect with other teachers. Therefore, some of the questions we will discuss are:

How do we choose which sessions to attend?
What are we looking for when we attend conferences?
Learning, presenting, networking: what is the best balance?

How can we cope with getting so much information at once?
How can we take notes in a useful way?
How can we use social media to improve our conference experience?
How can we reflect on what we’re hearing about?

How can we communicate and connect with other participants? How can we engage with the conference playfully? Can it sometimes help to move “outside” the design and flow of the conference, and how can we do that?
How can we cope with fatigue over two or three day conferences?
What do we do after conferences? How can we carry the “buzz” back into the classroom? How do we apply what we learned?

Should we think about setting goals for conferences? What kind of goals?
What should we do the week/ the day/ the morning before the conference?
Do you have any essential conference going equipment?
What are some of the best conference sessions that you have attended? Why were they so good? Did you expect them to be so good beforehand?

Of course, you should also feel free to bring and ask your own questions during the chat.

If you would like to take part in the chat, you will need a Twitter account. There are some excellent how-to guides at the top of the page (not written by us!). If you would like a more personal explanation, ask on the Facebook group and we’ll be happy to help. We’d also point out that while we are Korean centered, we’re by no means exclusive, and you should feel free to join us from anywhere in the world. We’d welcome the international perspective.

We hope to see you on Tuesday .

The #KELTChat team

 

This article from ELT Journal written by Simon Borg (and discussed further on his blog here)  was shared by David Harbinson on Twitter recently and might be of interest for those thinking about topic.

#KELTChat 14th September 2014 (8pm KT) – Making the most of reading materials

Good morning, afternoon or evening and welcome back to this season of #KELTChat. After our summer break and a public holiday, we are back with a one hour Twitter chat on Sunday 14th September 2014 at 8pm Korean time.

As voted for on our Facebook group, the topic for this chat is “Making the most of reading materials.” As ever, we have racked our brains for some questions that might prompt discussion, though we would point out that the chat is by no means limited to these, and should you have questions of your own to ask we would very much like to read and discuss them. One clarification is that we are thinking about textbook style reading texts, as opposed to graded readers and extensive reading.  Here are the questions:

  • What do we hope to achieve by using reading texts in class?
  • Ok you have a text that you need to use. You have been told students need to read it. What can you do with it?
  • What are different ways you can spice things up and move beyond read for gist and read for detail?
  • What are the best ways to exploit texts? How can you encourage students to revisit the text? Do you “mine the text’ for language points? If so, when and how?
  • Are there any follow up activities you have found to be effective?
  • How/ when/ why would you adapt a text for mixed level classes?
  • What would you do with a boring text?
  • How do we best work with fast and slow readers?
  • Why do people insist on giving students a reading text but no task other than “read this?”
  • Are there ways to move beyond the lockstep classes that can tend to happen when reading in class?

If you would like to take part in the chat, you will need a Twitter account. There are some excellent how-to guides at the top of the page (not written by us!). If you would like a more personal explanation, ask on the Facebook group and we’ll be happy to help. We’d also point out that while we are Korean centered, we’re by no means exclusive, and you should feel free to join us from anywhere in the world. We’d welcome the international perspective.

We hope to see you on Sunday.

The #KELTChat team