Candid Lesson Planning: A Very Special #KELTchat Slowburn. Tuesday 2014.10.14, 10am – 10pm Seoul time.

How do you really plan lessons? This question and others will be discussed in the next #KELTchat Twitter chat on Tuesday 2014.10.14, from 10 am to 10 pm Seoul time.

This is a special Slowburn because the final hour will find us LIVE on ELT Live in a Google Hangout hosted by Jeff Lebow of WorldBridges.

Candid lesson plan CHALLENGE!
For this chat we have a (totally optional) challenge to get you started whenever you arrive from 10 am to 10 pm.
If you can, share a picture of a real lesson plan, or of your real planning process. We want to peek inside your notebook/computer/brain!
Why is this how you plan? How often do you do it? How long do you spend?
Why is planning this way useful for you?

In addition to the challenge, please feel free to add your own questions and issues with planning and prep.

Some other questions to consider might be:

  • Are there any limitations about your planning you’ve been thinking about?
  • Is there anything you’re thinking about trying out regarding planning?
  • How is you planning similar and different than when you first starting teaching?
  • Who sees your plans?
  • What is an essential aspect of your plans or something you need to do?
  • What is your favourite part of lesson prep? Least favourite?
  • How/when/why do you throw away your plans during teaching?
  • Do you keep plans? Do you come back to them later? Why?
  • What sites, ideas and resources are helpful for you as related to lesson prep?
  • Have you heard any good quotes that can be related to lesson prep?
  • What aspects of preparing for classes take the longest for you? Do you have strategies for streamlining the preparation process?

#KELTchat Slowburn – Getting the most out of conferences (Tuesday, September 23rd 10 am-10 pm)

Photo by Rodd Lucier used under Creative Commons license https://www.flickr.com/photos/thecleversheep/3165592302/

Photo by Rodd Lucier used under Creative Commons license https://www.flickr.com/photos/thecleversheep/3165592302/

Hello again. #KELTChat’s fall/autumn activities continue with a return to our Slowburn™ chats. The topic is “Getting the most out of conferences,” and the chat will take place via the medium of Twitter on the 23rd September 2014 between the hours of 10 am and 10 pm, Seoul time.

The Slowburn chat is intended to be a more relaxed and less involved alternative to our intensive one hour chats. Spacing it out over twelve hours means that you have time to dip in and out as you wish, and topics have time to rise, fall, be resurrected and fully explored over the course of the day. We hope that this will better suit people with busy weekday schedules.

With at least two large East Asian conferences upcoming (the KOTESOL and JALT international conferences) we thought it would be a good time to look at how we can best use these opportunities to learn and connect with other teachers. Therefore, some of the questions we will discuss are:

How do we choose which sessions to attend?
What are we looking for when we attend conferences?
Learning, presenting, networking: what is the best balance?

How can we cope with getting so much information at once?
How can we take notes in a useful way?
How can we use social media to improve our conference experience?
How can we reflect on what we’re hearing about?

How can we communicate and connect with other participants? How can we engage with the conference playfully? Can it sometimes help to move “outside” the design and flow of the conference, and how can we do that?
How can we cope with fatigue over two or three day conferences?
What do we do after conferences? How can we carry the “buzz” back into the classroom? How do we apply what we learned?

Should we think about setting goals for conferences? What kind of goals?
What should we do the week/ the day/ the morning before the conference?
Do you have any essential conference going equipment?
What are some of the best conference sessions that you have attended? Why were they so good? Did you expect them to be so good beforehand?

Of course, you should also feel free to bring and ask your own questions during the chat.

If you would like to take part in the chat, you will need a Twitter account. There are some excellent how-to guides at the top of the page (not written by us!). If you would like a more personal explanation, ask on the Facebook group and we’ll be happy to help. We’d also point out that while we are Korean centered, we’re by no means exclusive, and you should feel free to join us from anywhere in the world. We’d welcome the international perspective.

We hope to see you on Tuesday .

The #KELTChat team

 

This article from ELT Journal written by Simon Borg (and discussed further on his blog here)  was shared by David Harbinson on Twitter recently and might be of interest for those thinking about topic.

#KELTChat 14th September 2014 (8pm KT) – Making the most of reading materials

Good morning, afternoon or evening and welcome back to this season of #KELTChat. After our summer break and a public holiday, we are back with a one hour Twitter chat on Sunday 14th September 2014 at 8pm Korean time.

As voted for on our Facebook group, the topic for this chat is “Making the most of reading materials.” As ever, we have racked our brains for some questions that might prompt discussion, though we would point out that the chat is by no means limited to these, and should you have questions of your own to ask we would very much like to read and discuss them. One clarification is that we are thinking about textbook style reading texts, as opposed to graded readers and extensive reading.  Here are the questions:

  • What do we hope to achieve by using reading texts in class?
  • Ok you have a text that you need to use. You have been told students need to read it. What can you do with it?
  • What are different ways you can spice things up and move beyond read for gist and read for detail?
  • What are the best ways to exploit texts? How can you encourage students to revisit the text? Do you “mine the text’ for language points? If so, when and how?
  • Are there any follow up activities you have found to be effective?
  • How/ when/ why would you adapt a text for mixed level classes?
  • What would you do with a boring text?
  • How do we best work with fast and slow readers?
  • Why do people insist on giving students a reading text but no task other than “read this?”
  • Are there ways to move beyond the lockstep classes that can tend to happen when reading in class?

If you would like to take part in the chat, you will need a Twitter account. There are some excellent how-to guides at the top of the page (not written by us!). If you would like a more personal explanation, ask on the Facebook group and we’ll be happy to help. We’d also point out that while we are Korean centered, we’re by no means exclusive, and you should feel free to join us from anywhere in the world. We’d welcome the international perspective.

We hope to see you on Sunday.

The #KELTChat team

#KELTchat Slowburn – Promoting Learner Autonomy: Stories, Sites, Sources, and Strategies (Tuesday, June 10th 10 am-10 pm)

KELTCHAT SLOWBURN (™) Last chat one of the semester
One day only!

We all know that promoting learner autonomy is A GOOD THING and is something we *should* be doing. From there it might get a bit more hazy. Maybe for some, a variety of questions spring up. Some of these that might help guide the chat are:

  • What can we do to promote learner autonomy?
  • What would you say to a teacher who says promoting learner autonomy is not their job?
  • What strategies do you recommend for introducing and sustaining learner autonomy?
  • How can we help students to see their English as a lifelong project, rather than as preparation for a series of tests?
  • What websites or digital tools would you recommend?
  • Are there any blog posts or articles related to this topic you can recommend?
  • Do you have any stories related to challenges and successes you have had with this you’d like to share 140 characters at a time?
  • Does the Korean context figure into all this? How?
  • Do you have any questions about learner autonomy?

We will try to tackle all of this, and more, between the hours of 10 am and 10 pm Korea time on Tuesday, 10th June 2014. If you would like to take part but don’t know how, see the guides at the top of the page, or ask someone who looks like they know what’s up via Twitter or our Facebook group.

#KELTChat 1st June 2014 (8pm KT) – Recycling, Reviewing and Repeating

I have written before that taxi drivers in South Korea probably ascribe a much greater degree of Korean fluency to me than I actually possess. This is because I tend to take at least my fair share of taxis here, and the kind of small talk interaction that takes place in taxis is fairly predictable. Thus, I’ve had a good amount of repetition of “taxi Korean”, and I handle these situations much more confidently and fluently than other, less familiar interactions.

This is generally not lost on language teaching theory, where we know that vocabulary learning requires multiple reviews of and encounters with a word. The world of Task-based Teaching and Learning research abounds with studies into the effects of task repetition on accuracy, complexity and fluency. However, at least in my classroom, the pressures of the syllabus, exams and the need to be seen to be progressing sometimes means that I don’t spend as much time as I should going over old material.

If this also rings true for you, #KELTChat is here to help. During the chat we might look at any of the following questions, or any other questions that you bring:

  • How much repetition, reviewing and recycling do you do in your classroom? How do you go about it?
  • How can we carve out space for a little R&R(&R)?
  • How can we help students to see the benefit of repetition and review, when all they want to do is rush on to the next piece of language?
  • How much is repetition and review the job of the teacher, and how much is the student responsible for?
  • What techniques have you heard of for repetition and review that you’d like to try?
  • Is there any technology out there that could help teachers and students?
  • Is there anything about repetition and reviewing that we need to condsider that is particularly relevant to Korea?

We will try to tackle all of this, and more, at 8pm Korea time on Sunday 1st June 2014. If you would like to take part but don’t know how, see the guides at the top of the page, or ask someone who looks like they know what’s up via Twitter or our Facebook group.

 

 

#KELTchat Slowburn – Communicating with Colleagues (Tuesday, May 20th 10 am-10 pm)

Relationships with colleagues can be a major factor in how much we enjoy and learn from a teaching position. They can also be a source or stress and confusion and more. If we want to avoid workplaces like this, communicating with our colleagues in ways that foster cordial relationships, collaboration and improvement in teaching is important. In this Slowburn, we would like to tackle some of the things we should think about while picking our way gingerly through staff room relationships. Here is a list of questions that we will base the chat on, but please feel free to bring your own questions and experiences too.

Do you…?/How do you…?:
    • foster a more collaborative relationship with colleagues when that seems like a worthwhile thing to do, but in a workplace that seems to discourage collaboration;
    • access the wisdom of experienced coworkers when that wisdom might not be shared spontaneously, or might not be sharable within ‘official wisdom sharing';
    • negotiate different teaching philosophies among colleagues;
    • approach new colleagues;
    • offer help to colleagues who are struggling;
    • model interactions to students;
    • respond to colleagues who may not have your best interests at heart;
    • avoid coming off as a cult recruiter when you mention KELTchat/KOTESOL/professional development;
    • deal with getting feedback you disagree with or think is just unhelpful from senior colleagues;
    • handle receiving criticism from a coworker in front of students;
    • communicate your teaching philosophy to senior coworkers?

We will try to tackle all of this, and more, between the hours of 10 am and 10 pm Korea time on Tuesday, 20th May 2014. If you would like to take part but don’t know how, see the guides at the top of the page, or ask someone who looks like they know what’s up via Twitter or our Facebook group.

Sun May 11th #KELTchat on Critical Pedagogy with Special Guest Moderator Divya Madhavan

Hello there and thanks for dropping by. We here at #KELTchat are thrilled and honoured to announce our topic and special guest moderator for the next KELTchat. The topic is Critical Pedagogy and the special guest moderator is Divya Madhavan. The date of the chat is May 11th and the time is 8 pm Korea time, which is 1 pm in Paris and Prague, 11:00 am GMT, 3:00 pm in Moscow, 8:00 am in Brasilia, and 7:00 am in Boston. For the times in other locations you can check here.  In addition to being kind enough to join us for the chat and to help moderate it Divya has also shared part 1 of a preview (on Cultural Capital) here and part 2, which is on the Hidden Curriculum, here and here is part 3 which is on the Banking Model of EducationWe are very much looking forward to the chat and hope you can join us. In the meantime, please head over to Divya’s (excellent) blog and check out the previews. While you are there you might want to check out her other posts as well!